Climate Change is Real (Year 7/8 Report)

From Greta Thunberg's emotional speeches to world leaders to the global climate change school strike, more and more young people are stepping up to fight climate change, and the students at BISA are no different!

Recently Year 7 & 8 presented a passionate assembly about the frightening reality of climate change. Here are some highlights of what was presented:

"We need to be aware that the world is changing fast and not in a good way because of us humans. If nothing is done we will cause, not only our own extinction but also other species. Imagine a new born baby slowly dying in 10 years and all a president can do, in one of the most powerful countries in the world, is build walls....

This is the 6th mass extinction and we are entirely to blame. It is up to us to stop this from happening fast. " - James

"Let’s look after our mother planet.  To stop animal extinction, we should stop throwing our trash into our oceans. We should encourage our governments to stop burning fuel and taking fossil fuels out of the ground. We should start using electric cars, walking or cycling more and fly less. It is never too late to change." - Yusrah

 "We are the first generation to really experience climate change and the last generation to do something about it. Climate change is not something to worry about in the coming decades. It is already here and strengthening. Climate change is not just a statement to grab our attention. It is real and we need to act now!" - Shreya

"The UN has released a report this week, written by 50 scientists from all over the world, which confirms that a million species will be on the brink of extinction in DECADES, IN OUR LIFE TIME. We can all do something, no matter how small. If we all act, it will make a difference. And remember, it is not just about saving the earth. The planet will still be here long after we have gone. This is about saving ourselves, our children and our grandchildren." - Nicolas

"Global warming is something we all have to live with. Because of generations before us, we have to ACT NOW. We cannot ignore this and pretend it is going to go away and that it will all be ok. We need to change our lifestyles. We need to persuade grownups, businesses, governments to listen and change. We need to act fast. " - Myles

As BISA continues to make changes across the school to do our part to fight climate change, we hope that you will support our efforts.

The ban on plastic bags - what it means for you and why it’s a positive opportunity for change.

From the 1stJune this year, Tanzania will join other East African nations and many countries worldwide in banning single use plastic bags; but why? Well that’s easy, pollution. Plastic bags are made from oil, which, when burnt, release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. When buried, they slowly degrade into microbeads that end up in our water sources and food products. Let’s be clear here, microbeads are not part of a healthy diet! 

So, what do the regulations actually say? It’s quite clear; ‘a total ban on the sale, distribution and use of ALL plastic bags, regardless of thickness.’

There are exceptions to this, that is ‘any of the following materials that are sold in plastic bags: food products, medical services, agricultural and construction materials, sanitary and waste management.’ 

Enforcement of the regulations will be by the police, revenue authority, ports authority and local councils… essentially anyone who is anyone in enforcement. In short, the best approach here, that is if you want to avoid some pretty hefty fines or jail time is to do what needs to be done - stop using any plastic bags.

If you’re a massive plastic bag user, change is coming. But this change shouldn’t be seen as a negative, it’s actually an alternative for many Tanzanians to create an economy making bags out on less polluting materials. You can support your local women’s groups by buying a kikapu and take your own bags to the shops. But remember, if you are caught with a plastic bag, it’s you that gets the fine.

For now, single use plastic bottles will remain, but based on what’s happening in the rest of the world, they too will soon be banned. 

- Marc Baker (Carbon Tanzania)

Tree Planting Day - 4th April

Our community tree planting day on Thursday 4th April was a great success. Students from Year 7 and 8 planted many trees at our school field. The students had an opportunity to learn how to plant the trees the correct way to ensure that no water is wasted and all water goes direct to the roots.

We would like to thank students for helping raise funds to buy trees during our 'Green Day', Arusha Rotary Club for helping us acquire the trees and Arusha branch of 'The Roots and Shoots Club by Dr. Jane Goodall' for donating the endangered indigenous trees and other species for the day.

We will continue to commit to planting trees to make a positive impact to the environment around us.

                                                    Derick Lawuo - Environmental Prefect

Young Enterprise introduce 'A Whole Lotta Honey'

After an amazing win for a well written annual report, the Young Enterprise Group has embarked on a new project: “A Whole Lotta Honey”. This new project will help attain the silver level in the competition.

The group hopes to raise money in order to buy tree seedlings to curb soil erosion in the Kisongo area. During the two weeks, we were able to design the logo that will not only be displayed on our honey jars but also around Braeburn School. We were also able to research the different methods to filter the natural honey we gratefully received from Mr. Lesso. The first filtration method that we came across was using a net sieve and pouring the honey onto a bucket and the second filtration method was using a common kitchen sieve to also filter the honey onto a bucket.

In the coming weeks, we hope to finish the filtration process, start bottling the honey and sell the honey to the Braeburn Community and hopefully outside it.

- Nempurrkel Sikar, Year 12W

Year 1 and 2 Adventure to Moivaro

The children from Year 1/2 in Njiro and Kisongo have been studying Houses and Homes and Materials over this term and, as part of their learning, travelled to Moivaro Village to visit Laura Tarimo and the young people from the KIMAMAVIMO (Moivaro Youth Group for Self-development and Care for the Environment) Project.

The homes within the project are all made completely from natural materials and, with everything from compost toilets to an organic farm, they have created an almost fully self-sustaining environment.

On arrival, the children met Laura, her family and volunteers from KIMAMAVIMO. Laura talked about how the houses were made and the materials they were made from, then the children were given the chance to go and explore.

Adventuring through the lush organic farm, the children learned how to identify different fruit trees and vegetable plants, as well as learning about composting.

One of the children's highlights was learning about the composting toilet which uses no water at all!

The children then had the opportunity to build their own mini-clay houses using stones, clay and sticks. They worked in teams to build up their structures, making them strong and safe. They loved getting their hands all muddy and working as a team. Their end results were impressive and many commented that they would love to live in a house like Laura's!

Thank you so much to Laura and the team for welcoming us and looking after us so well!